Zadie Smith Shows Her Development with 'NW'

By Ulin, David L | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Zadie Smith Shows Her Development with 'NW'


Ulin, David L, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Review

Zadie Smith's fourth novel, "NW," is a return of sorts to the voices and the northwest London landscape of her 2000 debut, "White Teeth." Like that book, it is exuberant, lush with language, concerned with the relationship of people to their city, with framing not just the lives of characters but also an entire social milieu. And yet, it is more than that, a real sign of how Smith has developed and grown.

"White Teeth," after all, was the work of a young writer -- Smith was 24 when it was published -- and it was marked by a young writer's excess, a young writer's lack of control.

In the decade since, she has done her share of growing up in public, producing a self-conscious homage to E.M. Forster, "On Beauty" and producing a series of very smart critical essays, gathered in the 2009 collection "Changing My Mind," that originally appeared in publications such as the New Yorker and The New York Review of Books.

"NW" suggests that she has found a way to balance these considerations -- the experiential and the literary or, more accurately, the outer and the inner life. It is a terrific novel: deeply ambitious, an attempt to use literature as a kind of excavation while at the same time remaining intensely readable, intensely human, a portrait of the way we live.

Built around four contemporaries -- Leah, Felix, Natalie and Nathan -- who intersect and break apart like ions, the book is an inquiry into many things: consciousness, mortality, community, isolation but, perhaps most important, how identity becomes a creation of the stories we tell about ourselves. "People were not people," Smith writes, "but merely an effect of language. You could conjure them up and kill them in a sentence."

Smith makes such an intention explicit from the outset, opening "NW" with an extended stream-of-consciousness section, "Visitation," about the story of Leah, a 30-something community activist who studied philosophy because "(p)hilosophy is learning how to die." The sequence highlights a subtle dislocation, because it is not dying that is Leah's problem but, rather, learning how to live.

"I am eighteen in my mind," she thinks, "I am eighteen and if I do nothing if I stand still nothing will change I will be eighteen always. For always. Time will never stop. I'll never die."

This is a key point, not just for Leah but for everyone, all adrift in the present, unmoored from the future and the past. In part, Smith indicates, that has to do with history; her characters are in the most fundamental sense uprooted, raised in marginal neighborhoods, from immigrant families, their attention directed from the earliest age at moving beyond. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Zadie Smith Shows Her Development with 'NW'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.