The Path to Prosperity Begins with Education; 'Pro-Schools, Pro- Business'; Helping Low-Income Students Is a Key to the Area's Economic Success; OTHER VIEWS

By Nolan, Thomas M | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), October 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Path to Prosperity Begins with Education; 'Pro-Schools, Pro- Business'; Helping Low-Income Students Is a Key to the Area's Economic Success; OTHER VIEWS


Nolan, Thomas M, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


While many decisions can set one on the wrong path in life, few exact a greater toll than failing to complete high school. High school dropouts, over their lifetimes, will earn half of what high school graduates earn. They are less likely to pay taxes and more likely to rely on welfare. They comprise 75 percent of all criminal convictions and more than 60 percent of prison populations. As the St. Louis economy struggles to emerge from recession, the metropolitan community, and especially the business community, should take to heart the words of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in its Sept. 7 editorial urging that we, "..... must be pro-schools to be pro-business."

It was a desire to increase the number of St. Louis high school graduates, especially from economically disadvantaged communities, which led to the creation of ACCESS Academies more than seven years ago. ACCESS partner schools implemented the unique NativityMiguel education model to prepare low-income middle school students for high school success. Thanks to the support of business, religious and civic leaders who viewed results-oriented education as an essential investment in St. Louis, ACCESS graduates succeed. Ninety six percent of the more than 400 middle school graduates have been placed in college prep high schools, 92 percent graduate on time and 80 percent are admitted to college.

But it's clear that a broader pathway needs to be cut for other students from low-income households whose academic achievement is undercut by unemployment, inadequate health care, crime and other social ills. Too often, because they have been born into struggling families, disadvantaged students are ill-prepared for school before they ever attend and, once they are in school, bring with them the same difficulties that afflict their homes. Too often they are the children who come to school tired, hungry, and without homework finished. And too often, they are the students who eventually drop out before completing high school.

To improve the likelihood that all children graduate from high school and move on to productive lives as citizens of St. Louis, three priorities must be addressed:

- Children in the city of St. Louis, especially those in poor families, must have greater access to early childhood education. Whether in child care facilities or schools, young children must be provided with an enriched development that enables them to enter kindergarten ready to learn. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Path to Prosperity Begins with Education; 'Pro-Schools, Pro- Business'; Helping Low-Income Students Is a Key to the Area's Economic Success; OTHER VIEWS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.