The First 100 Years: Innovation in Distance Learning

St. Joseph News-Press, October 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

The First 100 Years: Innovation in Distance Learning


(ARA) - As students nationwide head back to school this fall, it is fascinating to reflect on how education has evolved over the past century. According to a Harvard University Report, fewer than 10 percent of 18-year-olds in 1910 graduated from high school, compared to more than 75 percent in 2009, as reported by a similar study.

Furthermore, where a college education was once confined to an elite minority, higher education today is attainable for the majority of Americans. Perhaps the most dramatic impact was made by the emergence of distance learning, which allows students to access degree programs targeting their unique educational goals from anywhere in the world.

According to Going the Distance: Online Education in the United States, a 2011 report from the Babson Survey Research Group and the College Board, nearly one-third of all students in higher education are taking at least one online course. Enrollments for online courses at the elementary and secondary levels are growing as well. The Sloan Consortium, an advocacy group for online education, reports that an estimated 1.03 million students at the K-12 level nationwide took an online course in 2007-2008, up 47 percent from two years earlier.

Today, the United States pays tribute to the possibilities distance learning brings to education during National Distance Learning Week, Nov. 5-9. Sponsored by the United States Distance Learning Association, the awareness week seeks to promote and celebrate the growth and accomplishments occurring today in distance learning.

Distance learning hasn't always been associated with its modern day definition. Early 20th century students were introduced to their version of distance learning technology via the first portable silent movie projector. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The First 100 Years: Innovation in Distance Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.