Heaven Is a Precious Teaching of Judaism, Christianity and Islam

By Santangelo, Al | New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), October 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

Heaven Is a Precious Teaching of Judaism, Christianity and Islam


Santangelo, Al, New Haven Register (New Haven, CT)


Q: I'm a hospice nurse and I often find that my patients of the Jewish faith don't believe in an afterlife. In a recent newspaper article, a rabbi answering the question, "How would you explain death to a preschooler?" made no mention of an afterlife or of meeting God. He said that "at the very worst, death is like a deep, deep sleep."

I can understand when my patients question what comes after death (we all know what we have here, but no one knows for sure what comes next), but I find it so sad and hollow when a patient who's lived a whole and good life, spends his or her last days thinking he will soon fall into a pit of endless sleep. How do you help to comfort them? P.S. I love your column! -- F., Old Bethpage, N.Y., via email

A: Well, I was not that rabbi! I know and I teach children and adults that Judaism does believe in an afterlife for our souls. In fact, Christianity got this belief from Judaism.

The Judaism that made the case for heaven was rabbinic Judaism, not biblical Judaism where the idea of a soul and of heaven is either underdeveloped or nonexistent depending on the scholarly opinion you endorse. However, after the rabbis encountered Greek philosophy through Aristotle, who was the tutor of Alexander the Great and who conquered Israel in 333 BCE, the philosophical dualism of matter and form was transposed into the religious duality of body and soul.

This enabled Judaism, and later Christianity, to enthusiastically teach that our souls survive in "The world to come." This is why I recite the prayer at every funeral for the soul of the dearly departed to find rest in "The Garden of Eden." The rabbis taught, "This world is just a entryway to the world to come." They also taught, "One hour of bliss in the world to come is equal to all the bliss of this world." I teach children that the soul of the person they loved is safe and with God.

My belief in the teachings of Judaism that death is not the end of us is not a scientific fact but a core religious belief. It's also a part of my hope that there will be a time and a place where the scales of justice, which are often so askew here and now, will be set right there and then. …

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