Thoughtless Retention of Judges Can't Be Considered a Success; Missouri Plan; Voter Apathy Reveals a Weakness in State's Method of Judicial Elections

By Bross, Tim | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), October 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

Thoughtless Retention of Judges Can't Be Considered a Success; Missouri Plan; Voter Apathy Reveals a Weakness in State's Method of Judicial Elections


Bross, Tim, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


About 563,000 St. Louis Countians cast votes in the November 2008 election.

But when it came to making a yes-or-no vote about whether 19 judges should remain on the bench, up to a quarter of those citizens left the booth without making a decision.

All 19 were retained. Nothing new there. Since St. Louis County adopted the Missouri Plan of selecting judges in 1970, voters have never removed a judge.

Indeed, since the Missouri Plan was begun in 1940, only two judges have been removed by voters - one in Kansas City in 1942 and one in Clay County in 1992. (The Kansas City case was probably an anomaly. The judge in question had the support of the Tom Pendergast machine at a time when public sentiment had finally turned against the machine.)

To the Missouri Bar, this stability is a sign that the system works. The bar's website states: "The success of the plan in selecting qualified judges is evident from the fact that since its adoption, the public has not voted any appellate judge out of office, and only two circuit judges have been voted out of office."

Really? It's really a sign that the public as a whole in St. Louis city and Jackson, Greene, St. Louis, Clay and Platte counties believe every judge is doing a good job?

Doubtful. More likely is that most voters, who never have to go inside a county courthouse, don't care.

To its credit, the Bar is making a stronger effort to get the word out about judicial elections. It has compared turnouts for the governor's and judicial races since 2000, and the gap is narrowing. In 2008, 79 percent of the St. Louis Countians who voted for governor also voted on judges, the Bar said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Thoughtless Retention of Judges Can't Be Considered a Success; Missouri Plan; Voter Apathy Reveals a Weakness in State's Method of Judicial Elections
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.