Obama Has Edge in Electoral College Path to Victory; ELECTION 2012

By Beaumont, Thomas | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama Has Edge in Electoral College Path to Victory; ELECTION 2012


Beaumont, Thomas, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


COLUMBUS, OHIO President Barack Obama enters the final hours of the campaign with an edge in the hunt for the 270 electoral votes needed to win and more ways to reach that magic number. Yet the race is remarkably close in at least six states that could go either way, giving Republican Mitt Romney hope that he can pull off a come-from- behind victory.

If the election were held now, an Associated Press analysis found that Obama would be all but assured of 249 votes, by carrying 20 states that are solidly Democratic or leaning his way Iowa, Nevada and Pennsylvania among them and the District of Columbia. Romney would lay claim to 206, from probable victories in 24 states that are strong Republican turf or tilt toward the GOP, including North Carolina.

Up for grabs are 83 electoral votes spread across Colorado, Florida, Ohio, New Hampshire, Virginia and Wisconsin. Of those, Republicans and Democrats alike say Obama seems in a bit better shape than Romney in Ohio and Wisconsin, while Romney appears to be performing slightly better than Obama or has pulled even in Florida and Virginia.

The APs analysis is not meant to be predictive but instead to provide a snapshot of a race that has been extraordinarily close from the outset. The analysis is based on interviews with more than a dozen Republican and Democratic strategists in Washington and in the most contested states; public polls; internal campaign surveys; early vote figures; spending on television advertising; candidate travel; and get-out-the-vote organizations.

Both Republicans and Democrats say Tuesdays election has tightened across the board in the homestretch. Many factors are adding to the uncertainty, including early vote tallies, Election Day turnout and the impact of the storm Sandy in the East. Theres no telling the impact of Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson, whos on the ballot in 48 states, including all the battlegrounds, or Virgil Goode, an ex-congressman from Virginia who is running on the Constitution Party ticket.

DEMOGRAPHICS ARE KEY

But heres perhaps the biggest issue complicating efforts to get a handle on where the race really stands: different assumptions that each partys pollsters are making about the demographic makeup of the electorate. Republicans are anticipating that the body of voters who end up casting ballots will be more like the 2004 electorate, heavily white and male. Democrats argue that 2012 voters as a whole will look more like the electorate of four years ago when record numbers of minorities and young people turned out.

The difference has meant wildly disparate polling coming from Republicans and Democrats, with each side claiming that its measuring voter attitudes more precisely than the opposition.

Said Republican strategist Phil Musser: The conviction with which both sides say they are on a trajectory to victory is unique.

Tuesday will determine which side is correct. For now, the gulf between the two sides polling has made it difficult to judge which candidate is faring better in the six up-for-grabs states.

In the final hours of the campaign, national polls show a neck- and-neck race for the popular vote.

But its the Electoral College vote that elects the president. In that state-by-state race, Obama long has had the advantage because he started with more electoral votes in his column, giving him more ways to cobble together the victories he needs to reach 270. Romney has had more states but fewer votes, and, thus few paths though victory remained within his reach. …

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