Howe, James H. III James H. Howe

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Howe, James H. III James H. Howe


Howe, James H. IIIJames H. Howe, III, a resident of Palm Beach, Florida, died on Monday, November 19, 2012, at the age of 89, from complications of cancer at his St. Louis home. He was preceded in death by his parents, Martha Grant Howe and Nelson H. Howe, and his stepmother, Eleanor Lawther Howe. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Elizabeth Betty Scudder Howe and their five children: Susan Howe Dubin (Ron) of Greenwich, Connecticut, Marie Howe Sprague (Dan) of Lexington, Kentucky, along with Nelson H. Howe II (Cathy), Rebecca Becky Howe Hailand (Arthur) and James H. Howe IV (Mary), all residing in St. Louis. His pride and joy were his nine grandchildren: Elizabeth Kelly Freeman, Diana Maxwell Kelly, Justin Howe Kearns, Catherine Filley Howe, Elizabeth Bunn Hailand, Arthur G. Hailand IV, Henry Howe Hailand, Melissa Brenton Howe, and James H. Howe V. He is also survived by his sister, Eleanor N.L. Howe of Palm Beach, Florida, and a step-brother John D. Adams of Medford, Oregon. He was preceded in death by his step-sister, Sallie Adams Wilson. Born on February 16, 1923 in St. Louis, he graduated from St. Louis Country Day School (MICDS) and Washington University. After college, he joined the United States Navy attaining the rank of LTJG and served in World War II as Captain of an LCI in the Pacific. After the war and his discharge from the Navy, he began working at the family business, LewisHowe Co., whose principal product was Tums, and after serving as the President and Chairman of the Board for many years, he retired in the 1980's. He was devoted to his elementary school, Rossman School, having served on the Board and Advisory Board for decades. He was involved in the pivotal decision to move the school from the then Delmar campus to Conway Road in the early 1960's and the fundraising to do so. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Howe, James H. III James H. Howe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.