Road Trip: Snowshoe, W.Va

By Harrop, Joanne Klimovich | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Road Trip: Snowshoe, W.Va


Harrop, Joanne Klimovich, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Showshoe Mountain Ski Resort in West Virginia is open and ready for those who love to hit the slopes. Located in Pocahontas County on the eastern border of West Virginia, it is a place to enjoy a winter wonderland with skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, tubing, Snowcat tours, zip lining and more. There are 251 skiable acres, including 26 acres of freestyle terrain and seven acres of gladed terrain. The area gets 180 inches of snow annually.

The resort makes a guarantee from Dec. 15 through March 15, 2013, there will be more skiable terrain open than any other ski mountain in the Southeast or your next day of skiing is free.

"Snowshoe is the one true destination ski mountain in the mid- Atlantic," says David Dekema, vice president of marketing for Snowshoe. "Offering a total resort experience you might otherwise think you'd have to fly to find. With great skiing and boarding on the biggest mountain, plus a quaint walking village, choice of restaurants, the best nightlife, shopping, swimming pools and The Big Top game center for kids. Snowshoe has it all."

From St. Bernard Catholic Chapel and the Pocahontas Episcopal Ministries on top of the mountain to dining options to shopping, this area has a variety of options after guests are done playing in the snow. Stores feature everything from the latest ski and snowboard equipment and outerwear to hand-carved West Virginia wood products to logwear and knick-knacks.

Snowshoe is nicknamed the "Birthplace of Rivers" for the eight rivers that flow out of Pocahontas County: the Greenbrier, Shaver's Fork of the Cheat, Tygart Valley, Williams, Cherry, Cranberry, Gauley and Elk.

Details: Snowshoe Mountain Ski Resort, 10 Snowshoe Drive, Snowshoe, W.Va.; 304-572-1000 or www.snowshoemtn.com

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at jharrop@tribweb.com or 412-320-7889.

Pocahontas County Opera House

This opera house is the county's premier performing-arts center. An intimate venue, with seating for about 250, it is part of the West Virginia Historic Theatre Trail. It has more than a dozen performances on its stage each year, ranging from bluegrass to jazz, folk to musical theater.

Ornate pressed-metal panels adorn the ceiling, and the large performance hall is accented by a balustrade of American chestnut, which wraps around three sides of the balcony. Light pours in through the building's 32 windows.

In 1991, Pocahontas County's Historic Landmarks Commission purchased the Opera House and, with support from the community, worked to transform it from an abandoned building into a beautiful performance space and center for community activities, reopening its doors and bringing performances to its stage once again in 1999.

The century-old building is on the National Register of Historic Places. It also hosts a variety of community events, from open jam sessions to family-movie nights. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Road Trip: Snowshoe, W.Va
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.