HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ; Broadband Councils Grants Snub Criticized Promotion Projects Denied Funding

By Eyre, Eric | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), December 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ; Broadband Councils Grants Snub Criticized Promotion Projects Denied Funding


Eyre, Eric, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


The West Virginia Broadband Deployment Council's refusal to award grant money to projects that encourage rural residents to subscribe to high-speed Internet is a "profound disappointment" and shows a "lack of leadership," a Pendleton County nonprofit group said Thursday.

"If the council wasn't going to consider demand promotion projects, they should have had the courtesy to say so," said Douglas McConatha, executive director of Circleville-based Future Generations. "A lot of hard-working people wouldn't have wasted their time and money preparing these grant applications, and taxpayer money wouldn't have been wasted paying consultants to review and rank the applications."

Frontier Communications, which planned to partner with Future Generations, also criticized the council Thursday.

"It's regrettable the council's actions are depriving thousands of worthy West Virginians from having access to computers and Internet access," said Ken Arndt, Frontier's East Region president. "We are disappointed with the council's decision and hope it can find a way to fulfill its state-mandated mission by ultimately funding these demand projects."

Earlier this week, the Broadband Deployment Council voted to award $2.05 million to wireless Internet providers that plan to build towers and provide broadband service to new customers.

However, council members didn't award a dime to projects that promote broadband demand - even though the governor-appointed board had an extra $1.7 million to distribute.

The council paid a Pennsylvania consulting group, L.R. Kimball, to score and rank project applications.

Future Generations requested more than $900,000 for four projects that would encourage people to sign up for broadband in Southern West Virginia.

Future Generations' proposals ranked highest among all applications. The consultant strongly recommended that the Broadband Deployment Council fund the Future Generations' projects.

In a split vote, the council rejected the recommendation, saying infrastructure projects - fiber-optic broadband networks and wireless Internet towers - should be funded first.

Some board members said it wouldn't make sense to fund broadband promotion projects in areas where high-speed Internet isn't available.

Council Chairman Dan O'Hanlon refused to comment Thursday.

The council has until Dec. 19 to distribute the $1.7 million in leftover funds, but no additional meetings have been scheduled for this month. The council could make grant money available again next year. Groups would have to re-apply for funds.

Future Generations leaders said state law requires the council to fund projects that tout broadband.

"Demand promotion is an essential complement to infrastructure projects," said LeeAnn Shreve, director of Future Generations Rural America. "West Virginians, especially poorer families with marginal incomes, have a difficult choice in whether or not to subscribe to broadband, and many are still without computers in the home."

A recent Federal Communications Commission report - called "Reducing the Broadband Gap in West Virginia" - ranks West Virginia 45th in the nation for the percentage of people who subscribe to high-speed Internet. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ; Broadband Councils Grants Snub Criticized Promotion Projects Denied Funding
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.