Kids and Digital Media: Removing the Fears

By the Monitor's Board | The Christian Science Monitor, December 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Kids and Digital Media: Removing the Fears


the Monitor's Board, The Christian Science Monitor


Here is what many parents face this Christmas:

Among 6-to-12-year-olds, the top wish in gifts is a mobile device either a tablet computer or a smart phone.

And the top two bestselling video games (names withheld on purpose) involve military shooting.

Add these two together and parents may wonder how they can better safeguard their children from the head-spinning advances in digital devices and digital media.

They are not alone.

The possibility that 20-year-old Adam Lanza was addicted to war- themed video games before his shooting rampage in Newtown, Conn., has renewed calls for a government study on the possible link between real and imaginary violence.

And an explosion of software applications more than 1.4 million now available online pushed the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) this week to toughen up privacy rules for online services that try to track the online behavior of kids under 13.

Such concerns about media and children should not be alarming, writes media expert Lynn Schofield Clark of the University of Denver in a new book, The Parent App. The new digital media can instead provide an opportunity to change the conversation from one that is guided by fear to one of realism and possibility.

She points out that the new communication technologies do not raise the level of risk for young people. But they can contribute to social trends already under way, such as isolation and a focus on self.

We want technologies that assist us in guiding our children as unique individuals, yet we risk inculcating in them a sense that others are sources of competition rather than members of a community in which, in an important sense, we will fail or thrive together, Ms. Clark writes.

She interviewed hundreds of parents and found upper-income families use new media primarily as an educational tool, while lower- income parents use it to encourage their kids to focus on family and as a means for self-expression. …

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