Veteran Bridges WWII History Gap

By Cloonan, Patrick | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 27, 2012 | Go to article overview

Veteran Bridges WWII History Gap


Cloonan, Patrick, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


South Allegheny Middle School eighth-graders used "The Diary of Anne Frank" to reach across the generations between them and Rae Zurovcik.

"Anne Frank thought people are basically good," Zurovcik, 88, of Port Vue, told the 12- and 13-year-olds in Janel Vitai's class last week.

"People are basically good," she agreed, "But some are not."

Zurovcik knows about the goods and evils played out in Anne Frank's era, World War II. The native of Great Britain was 15 in 1939 when the war began, and the story of her life during the war years brought history to Zurovcik's students in a way books cannot.

Vitai invited Zurovcik, who became the bride of an American serviceman, to her class after hearing her speak at an assembly. Vitai said an account from someone who "had personally been" through the war would illuminate her students' studies of Anne Frank's book. The diary was kept by the teenaged Frank while she was in hiding during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. She later died in a concentration camp.

"Did you ever see a concentration camp?" Devin Brown asked.

She didn't but the British heard rumors about the camps, in which Jews and others deemed enemies of the German state were held and killed.

"I don't think people really believed it at first," said Zurovcik, who knew people who had seen them. "It was mind boggling."

In 1940, Zurovcik's father moved the family to the country from London when the Germans began their blitz air attack on the city. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Veteran Bridges WWII History Gap
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.