Husband's Unwarranted Suspicions Perturb Spouse

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 15, 2013 | Go to article overview

Husband's Unwarranted Suspicions Perturb Spouse


Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, Jan. 15, the 15th day of 2013. There are 350 days left in the year.

Highlights in history

In 1559: England's Queen Elizabeth I was crowned in Westminster Abbey.

In 1777: The people of New Connecticut declared their independence. (The republic later became the state of Vermont.)

In 1862: The U.S. Senate confirmed President Abraham Lincoln's choice of Edwin M. Stanton to be Secretary of War, replacing Simon Cameron.

In 1929: Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta.

In 1943: Work was completed on the Pentagon, headquarters of the U.S. Department of War (now Defense).

In 1947: The mutilated remains of 22-year-old Elizabeth Short, who came to be known as the "Black Dahlia," were found in a vacant Los Angeles lot; her slaying remains unsolved.

In 1954: Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio got married at San Francisco City Hall. (The marriage lasted nine months.)

In 1973: President Richard Nixon announced the suspension of all U.S. offensive action in North Vietnam, citing progress in peace negotiations.

In 1993: In Paris, a disarmament ceremony ended with the last of 125 countries signing a treaty banning chemical weapons.

In 2009: US Airways Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger ditched his Airbus 320 in the Hudson River after a flock of birds disabled both engines; all 155 people aboard survived.

Five years ago: During a visit to Saudi Arabia, President George W. Bush warned that surging oil prices threatened the U.S. economy, and he urged OPEC nations to boost their output.

One year ago: At the Golden Globes, "The Artist" won best musical or comedy; "The Descendants" won best drama.,by JERALDINE SAUNDERS

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Once you have stretched your mind by accepting new concepts, it is impossible to fit back into old, limiting ideas.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The small things you do add to your experience and success, but you might not see the results until everything is finally pieced together.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Rather than impulsively following the whim of the day, write down innovative ideas for future reference. You could shine in group situations.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): A determination to succeed with business or career might help you reach new heights. Put finishing touches on major undertakings with painstaking care.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Because you are sharper than usual, this is an excellent day to ferret out key information or learn new skills.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your cellphone or any other communication tool can be your best friend in a crisis or when your work requires easy access to information. Show off your creative skills.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Possessiveness may be flattering, but may only mean that people want to keep you under their control. Offset strictness with kindness.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The only people you should get even with are those who have helped you in the past. If you participate in a group function, you may win the heart of a new admirer.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Be alert for situations where there could be a careless loss of cash. A place for everything and everything in its place should be your motto.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You should be diligent about dialing for dollars. Social contacts could offer a great resource for business success.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A new gadget or game could mesmerize you so that you neglect something of greater importance. Don't be distracted.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Group activities can offer a new set of contacts and camaraderie to the point that you feel as though you have found a new home. Increased energy levels spur accomplishment. …

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