Obama's Ideology & Citizens' Rights

By Napolitano, Andrew P | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 25, 2013 | Go to article overview

Obama's Ideology & Citizens' Rights


Napolitano, Andrew P, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Here is an uncomfortable pop quiz: Who has killed more children - - Adam Lanza or Barack Obama?

We'll hold off on the answer for a few paragraphs while we look at the state of governmental excess -- including killing -- in America. But you can probably guess the correct answer from the manner in which I have posed the question.

We all know that the anchor of our liberties is the Declaration of Independence. In his inaugural address earlier this week, President Obama, himself, quoted Thomas Jefferson's most famous line. Obama recognized that all men and women are created equal and endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights and that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

No doubt Obama would like to modify the word "created" to read "shall be maintained," since his presidency seems dedicated to keeping us equal, not in terms of equality of rights and opportunity but of outcome. He has dedicated himself to using the coercive power of the federal government to take from those who have and give to those who don't.

Under the Constitution, charity is a decision for individuals to make, not the government.

There is simply no authority in the Constitution for the feds to tax Americans or to borrow money in their names to rebuild private homes in New Orleans or at the Jersey Shore.

This shows how far we have come from the Constitution the Founders gave us. They "constituted" a government of limited powers, and they did so because they wanted the government to protect our freedoms, since they understood that personal responsibility and freedom -- not government handouts -- are the soundest routes to prosperity.

Obama is not only the head of the executive branch of the federal government, but he is also the head of one of the two dominant political parties. …

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