Obama's Declaration of Collectivism

By Kudlow, Lawrence | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, January 26, 2013 | Go to article overview

Obama's Declaration of Collectivism


Kudlow, Lawrence, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


One of the least remarked upon aspects of President Obama's inaugural speech was his attempt to co-opt the Founding Fathers' Declaration of Independence to bolster his liberal-left agenda.

Sure, the president quoted one of the most important sentences in world history: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

So far, so good. But he later connected the Declaration with his own liberal agenda: "... that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges; that preserving our individual freedom ultimately requires collective action." (My italics, not his.)

He fleshed this out with his trademark class-warfare, income- leveling rationalizations. Such as: "The shrinking few do very wellm and a growing many barely make it." He also talked about "Our wives, mothers and daughters that earn a living equal to their effort." He followed that up with, "The wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship."

Here's what I take away from all this: Mr. Obama is arguing counter to the Founding Fathers that the pursuit of happiness is the pursuit of equality of results, not the equality of opportunity, and that he will do what he can to use government to make everybody more equal in terms of their income and life work.

That is exactly wrong. We should be rewarding success. We should be promoting entrepreneurship. We should be encouraging individual effort and opportunity.

But this was no opportunity speech. This was a redistributionist, income-leveling speech. And it completely missed the point of the Founding Fathers some 237 years ago.

They were talking about the equality of opportunity, not results. Theirs was a declaration of freedom, not government power or authority.

In fact, the Declaration of Independence was written expressly to begin a revolution against the autocratic monarchs of England, who used their government authority to tax, regulate and oppress the colonists without any representation or voting rights, thus denying them the unalienable rights of liberty.

So while Obama was on the one hand preaching "fidelity to our founding principles," on the other he was saying that preserving our individual freedom ultimately requires collective action.

Collective action? The Founders were talking about individual liberty and rights. …

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