"American Reunion" [Derived Headline]

By Conti, Garrett | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

"American Reunion" [Derived Headline]


Conti, Garrett, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


"American Reunion" (2012, R, 113 min., $29.98): It appears the whole gang is really back together for the first time since the successful 1999 teen comedy "American Pie" won over audiences.

The franchise has suffered through some awful sequels, but the latest, written and directed by Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg, is an improvement. "American Reunion" is no comedic K.O., though. The film delivers a few laughs, mostly from Sean William Scott's notorious Stifler character, but it depends largely on the raunchy jokes we've seen before.

If you liked the earlier flicks, give this corny, yet nostalgic, comedy a chance to put you back in touch with the 'American Pie" crew.

"Margaret" (2011, R, 150 min., $29.98): It's been a bumpy road for director Kenneth Lonegran's "Margaret."

Completed in 2007, the film faced numerous problems after the cameras were put away and the actors went home. The film finally made its theatrical debut in 2011.

The wait was worth it.

"Margaret" is a stirring drama with an unyielding screenplay and outstanding performances from Anna Paquin, J. Smith-Cameron, Jeannie Berlin and Matt Damon.

Paquin is in the main role as a high-schooler growing up in New York City. When she sees a bus driver (Mark Ruffalo) accidentally kill a woman after running a red light, her life changes forever. Immediately after the crash, Lisa tells detectives she didn't see if the driver did anything wrong.

Soon after, the guilt begins eating away at her, and it affects the relationship with her mother (Smith-Cameron) and school friends.

"The Flowers of War" (2011, R, 146 min., $27.98): This Golden Globe nominee details the harrowing story of an American mortician (Christian Bale), a group of prostitutes and a gathering of schoolgirls trying to survive the war in Nanking in a Catholic convent for girls.

As they finally come together to plan an escape, it's realized that an enormous sacrifice will be needed in order for some of them to live. …

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