Whats Up/Heads Up

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 8, 2013 | Go to article overview

Whats Up/Heads Up


02.09 Womens basketball tryouts The Arch Angels womens semi- professional basketball team will hold tryouts from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday for women age 20 and older who have college-level playing experience. Tryouts will be at the Rec O Plex, 2038 Chambers Road in Ferguson. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ ArchAngelsBasketball or call team owner Mesho Morrow at 314-437- 4580.

02.12 Free breast cancer screenings Mercys mobile mammography van will be at Sts. Joachim & Ann Care Services, 4116 McClay Road in St. Charles, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday for a community breast cancer screening for women ages 40 to 64. The exam is free for the uninsured and underinsured. Appointments are required and may be made by calling 314-251-6300 or toll-free at 1-800-446-3742. Bring insurance card; for those with no insurance, bring proof of income. All screenings are read by radiologists at Mercy Hospital St. Louis.

02.15 Nursing history conference The College of Nursing at the University of Missouri-St. Louis will present its sixth annual African-American Nursing History Conference from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 15 at the J.C. Penney Conference Center on UMSLs north campus. The conferences theme is Health Disparities Call to Action with a renewed focus on diseases such as cancer, HIV-AIDS, lupus, sickle cell, Crohns disease, diabetes and obesity, and their impact on the African-American community. The conference features speakers from the St. Louis health care community, including Melba Moore, St. Louis city health commissioner, and Dr. Delores Gunn, director of the St. Louis County Health Department. The registration fee is $30, which includes a continental breakfast and lunch. …

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