Does the Republican Party Have a Future?

By Parker, Star | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, February 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Does the Republican Party Have a Future?


Parker, Star, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


The United States, from day one, was a project about principles and ideals. The superpower that emerged and grew from the original handful of colonists was not the product of where those colonists happened to land, but of the ideals and principles in their heads and hearts, applied in how they lived their lives.

The Republican Party was founded in 1854 to address one great blot on the nation's founding legacy -- the existence of slavery in a nation founded under the ideal of freedom under God.

Runaway slave and self-educated abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass said, "I am a Republican, a black, dyed in the wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress."

Douglass called Abraham Lincoln, America's first Republican president, "emphatically the black man's president."

When some 30 years ago I told the welfare officer to not bother showing up again at my home -- when I decided that my own future would be based on the values of Scripture, work and personal responsibility -- there was no doubt in my mind which party would become my political home. The party of "freedom and progress," the party of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

But as longshoreman philosopher Eric Hoffer once observed, "Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket."

It's no mystery why the Republican Party is having a hard time today. No matter how hard you squint and try to discern the values of Lincoln and Douglass, or any values, for that matter, in those now wielding the money and power at the top of the party, they've disappeared. These establishment Republican leaders and operatives are not about ideals and values but business -- their own business.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the latest estimate from the Congressional Budget Office is that unemployment will "remain above 7. …

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