Five Edward Gorey Stories That Everyone Should Read

By Ortiz, Aimee | The Christian Science Monitor, February 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Five Edward Gorey Stories That Everyone Should Read


Ortiz, Aimee, The Christian Science Monitor


What do Tim Burton, The Tiger Lillies, PBS, and Lemony Snicket all have in common? They all have taken inspiration from the one and only Edward Gorey. Today, Mr Gorey would have turned 88, so it is only fitting that Google celebrate him with a doodle. The Google doodle shows an illustration of Gorey with some of his most famous characters.

Gorey published his first book, "The Unstrung Harp," in 1953. He quickly shot to fame due to his characteristic ink drawings and his dark yet lighthearted stories. Categorized by the literary nonsense movement, Gorey often wrote sentences like: It would carry off objects of which it grew fond, And protect them by dropping them into the pond. It was his nonsensical, macabre, yet playful writing that kept Gorey in the spotlight.

By the end of his life, Gorey had contributed more than 100 different works to the world. He was an accomplished writer, illustrator, and costume designer. The old man with his long white beard and soulful eyes had won over audiences and inspired artists.

In celebration of Goreys birthday, here are five Edward Gorey stories that everyone must read:

1) The Doubtful Guest: Published in 1957, The Doubtful Guest has become one of Goreys most popular and often quoted books. This little tale is about a peculiar penguin-like creature that goes to live with (and wreak havoc on) an aristocratic family. Unfortunately for the family, the creature is there to stay. It came seventeen years ago -- and to this day It has shown no intention of going away. …

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