South Korea's First Female President Innagurated Today. Will She Bring Change? (+Video)

By Boroweic, Steven | The Christian Science Monitor, February 25, 2013 | Go to article overview

South Korea's First Female President Innagurated Today. Will She Bring Change? (+Video)


Boroweic, Steven, The Christian Science Monitor


South Koreas first female president, Park Geun-hye, was sworn in today, taking the helm of the dynamic northeast Asian state at a tumultuous time both for the economy and for relations with North Korea.

President Park, daughter of a former ruler and a conservative, was voted in on a wave of frustration following five-years of the outgoing Lee Myung-bak government that saw a widening of economic inequality, curtails to freedom of speech across South Korea, and two nuclear tests by North Korea.

As Ms. Parks government begins to take shape, many are wondering if she will follow through on her pledge to oversee a substantial departure from the policies of the Lee government of which Park herself has been highly critical.

The members she chose [for her incoming cabinet] are reliable and have experience in government administration," says Bong Young- shik, an analyst at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies, an independent think tank in Seoul. "They are familiar figures, he says.

One name that has raised eyebrows is incoming Justice Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn. Mr. Hwang is a former judge and enthusiastic proponent of South Koreas National Security Law (NSL), which was enacted in 1948, after Japanese colonial occupation and before the beginning of the Korean War, which prohibits South Koreans from aiding, funding, supporting or otherwise helping "anti-state" organizations. According to a 2012 Amnesty International report, between 2008 and 2011 the number of cases where charges were filed in this area increased by 95.6 percent.

In particular, the government targeted people participating in activities perceived as being pro-North Korea.

The law's most controversial clause is Article 7 which demands criminal prosecution for any person who praises, incites or propagates the activities of an anti-government organization. Critics say this clause is vaguely worded and meant to stifle dissent; supporters say it is needed to protect South Koreas fragile truce with North Korea. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

South Korea's First Female President Innagurated Today. Will She Bring Change? (+Video)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.