Law Schools Should Offer an OWendell; Special Certificates; Students Should Get More Training for Jobs outside the Legal Profession

By Weiss, Benjamin | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Law Schools Should Offer an OWendell; Special Certificates; Students Should Get More Training for Jobs outside the Legal Profession


Weiss, Benjamin, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The great thing in this world is not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving. Oliver Wendell Holmes

The structural changes underfoot in the legal profession have wreaked havoc on the psyches and balance sheets of an entire generation of law students. With clients no longer content to underwrite on-the-job associate training, law firms are finding it uneconomical to hire new grads. Consequently, scores of graduates have been squeezed out of the legal market and left with crippling student debt. Their frustration came to a head in 2011 as over- indebted, unemployed law graduates filed a wave of class-action lawsuits accusing law schools of inflating postgraduate employment statistics. A suit filed in Illinois alleges a systemic, ongoing fraud that is ubiquitous in the legal education industry and threatens to leave a generation of law students in dire financial straits. Hell hath no fury like a scorned J.D.

The industry contraction is not a flash-in-the-pan. In his book, Failing Law Schools, law professor Brian Tamahana estimates that law schools produce 45,000 graduates annually. Against this putative supply, Tamahana projects that there will be demand for only 25,000 lawyers each year through 2018. Improvements in global communication infrastructure will further exacerbate the supply glut. Outsourcing firm CPA Global can charge one-eighth of the price of an American law firm for legal work performed by one of its Indian attorneys. ValueNotes, an Indian consulting group, estimates that Indias legal outsourcing revenues will grow from $440 million in 2011 to more than $1.6 billion in 2014. A large percentage of this growth will come at expense of aspiring associates. Enhanced computer programs, such as e-discovery software, will further reduce the need for human capital.

Employing logic that only the Mad Hatter could appreciate, law schools have responded to the crisis by incorporating more real world legal skills classes into their curriculums. This means an increased focus on trial practice, client counseling and legal writing. The Washington and Lee School of Law redesigned its third- year to make it predominantly practice-oriented. New York Law School has hired more working attorneys to teach classes in client counseling. Numerous other law schools have similarly doubled-down on nuts and bolt legal training.

In the face of increased supply and muted demand, it makes little sense to force-feed students a diet of specialized legal skills that have little application in fields outside of law. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Law Schools Should Offer an OWendell; Special Certificates; Students Should Get More Training for Jobs outside the Legal Profession
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.