New Venue Is Making the Most of (Blank) Space; Kaveh Razani's Cherokee Street Venue Is Home to Music, Poetry, Film, Art and More; MUSIC+NIGHTLIFE

By Johnson, Kevin C. | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

New Venue Is Making the Most of (Blank) Space; Kaveh Razani's Cherokee Street Venue Is Home to Music, Poetry, Film, Art and More; MUSIC+NIGHTLIFE


Johnson, Kevin C., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The new (blank) space at 2847 Cherokee Street is making its name by letting its patrons make it whatever they want.

Owner Kaveh Razani was content letting the address speak for itself. But convention ruled, and the mixed-use community space was named (blank) space.

"That was a huge phobia of mine," he says. "I was hesitant to name it, but I had to bite the bullet."

Razani kicked around ideas for a name with rapper-producer Black Spade of Hawthorne Headhunters, and Spade came up with (blank) space.

Since opening in March, (blank) space has been home to rock and punk concerts, Nappy DJ Needles' Turn It Up! event, DJ Willpower's Afro Beat Down party and Corey Black's Poetic Justice poetry set, along with film screenings, art openings, lectures, and community and organization meetings.

Poetic Justice is on the books for the last Sunday of each month, while Bump & Hustle, an all-vinyl funk-and-soul DJ spin, is every second Friday.

"The atmosphere is organic, and there is a great energy inside there," Corey Black says. "The whole ambiance is perfect for people to be creative and caters to people expressing themselves."

The 3,600-square-foot (blank) space is best described as homey - so much so that concerts can feel more like house parties.

Razani also describes the venue as a comfortable and approachable place where people of different cultures can interact without issue.

The main-level room is an open space with an intricate tin ceiling, exposed brick and hardwood floors.

"It's a classic St. Louis building in its beautiful form," Razani says. "We didn't have to do anything."

Razani filled the space with some of his own stuff, and his love of books is evident. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Venue Is Making the Most of (Blank) Space; Kaveh Razani's Cherokee Street Venue Is Home to Music, Poetry, Film, Art and More; MUSIC+NIGHTLIFE
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.