Obama's Labor Pick Is Just Another Radical

By Limbaugh, David | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, March 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Obama's Labor Pick Is Just Another Radical


Limbaugh, David, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


No matter what progress Republicans may make in electoral politics over the coming years, it will be difficult to roll back the steady march of liberalism that has taken place inside our cultural, bureaucratic and legal institutions -- from academia to regulatory agencies to the Department of Justice -- but we have to try.

A good place to start would be to oppose Obama's radical appointees, the latest being his appointment for secretary of labor, Thomas Perez.

Radical liberals are characteristically activists, strategists and organizers. Their plan to infiltrate and dominate academia was hardly spontaneous, and its effects have hardly been sporadic. Peruse any university course catalog and notice the kinds of political tripe that pass for core studies.

The same phenomenon occurs throughout the nation's regulatory bureaucracies. Liberals have managed to place so many ideologically charged people inside powerful administrative agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency, that these institutions tend to be radicalized from the bottom up. The radicals pursue their radical agenda no matter how out of phase it is with the will of the majority of Americans -- as if the majority even has a clue or has time to apprise itself as to the kinds of things going on.

But it's not just that we have a disproportionate number of leftists populating our institutions and agencies. This imbalance wouldn't matter so much if their every action weren't driven by ideology and if they played by the rules. But they often see their calling as being not so much to perform their assigned tasks as it is to use their positions to effect radical societal changes.

They don't have the same reverence for the Constitution and the rule of law as conservatives. They view things through an ideological prism and act in deference to their ideology and their political ends more than their conservative counterparts. They see themselves as activist agents for change, as crusaders with the lofty goal of advancing an agenda so morally superior that they don't think twice about bending and twisting rules and selectively interpreting laws and regulations to serve their agenda.

These radicals will continue to pursue their mischief irrespective of the political appointees overseeing their operations, but let's not fool ourselves; the appointees do matter - - some do more than others -- and can make a difference over the long haul. Justice Department and Labor Department appointees are two glaring examples. Department and division heads set policy and set the tone.

Through their radical prism, leftist Justice Department honchos are often blinded to such legitimately noble principles as equal protection of the laws. …

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