Oklahoma: Art Deco Style, Music and More in Tulsa

By Speed, Hillary | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), March 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

Oklahoma: Art Deco Style, Music and More in Tulsa


Speed, Hillary, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


TULSA, Okla. As an Oklahoma transplant a native New Englander who moved here for love I've had fun getting to know the Sooner State. I also host the occasional out-of-town visitor, so I'm always on the hunt for colorful history, interesting art, quirky shopping and a great meal. I have found it all, plus some surprises, in Oklahoma's second-largest city: Tulsa.

Tulsa was initially occupied by Native American tribes forced to relocate here from their home territories by the Indian Removal Act of 1830. But the modern city was built from oil money in the early 20th century. There was already a railroad station here serving the cattle industry when oil was discovered in nearby Red Fork in 1901, so Tulsa became the logical place for oilmen from tycoons to middlemen to so-called wildcatters looking for the next big well to settle with their families.

What you find here now is an eclectic mix of new and old: artsy hangouts that show off Tulsa's thriving hipster culture as well as well-preserved historic gems that harken back to the oil boom of the early 1900s. As somebody who seeks out both highbrow art and underground subculture, I love this about Tulsa.

DOWNTOWN ARCHITECTURE

At first glance, downtown Tulsa can seem quiet and a little rugged at the edges. But if you know where to go and you practice the art of looking up at the buildings instead of down at your feet, you'll find a great display of art deco architecture and other turn- of-the-century styles.

Tulsa was a "young city ... experiencing unprecedented growth and prosperity in the Roaring Twenties, just as the Art Deco movement came into vogue," according to the Tulsa Preservation Commission's website. "Flush with oil money, prominent Tulsans started building the skyscrapers that would spur one of the pre-eminent Art Deco collections in the United States."

The most striking example of Tulsa's art deco treasures might be the Boston Avenue Methodist Church, 1301 South Boston Avenue. You can't miss its 258-foot tower, holding court at the city's southeastern edge. Somehow the building, erected in 1929, manages to look like a church and a skyscraper all at once.

Straight down Boston Avenue from the church sits another beauty: the Philtower Building, 427 South Boston Avenue, which was commissioned by prominent oilman Waite Phillips and opened in 1928. Look for the gargoyles above the Boston Avenue entrance, and look way up to see the colorful tiled roof, a splash of strange, almost lovably outdated hues that floats above the city as a relic of the past.

Also worth a look are the Atlas Life Building, 415 South Boston Avenue; the Mayo Hotel (where you can book a room or grab a gourmet meal), 115 West Fifth Street; and the Philcade building, 509 South Boston Avenue. The building facades are only the beginning: On a weekday afternoon, it's fun to wander into the lobbies for stunning views of ceilings and chandeliers.

For more information, visit tulsapreservationcommission.org.

IN SEARCH OF FINE ART

In addition to its architectural gems, Tulsa boasts two wonderful major art museums.

Ten minutes northwest of downtown, Gilcrease Museum, 1400 North Gilcrease Museum Road, houses an expansive collection of art from the American West (the largest worldwide, they say) and an array of Native American artifacts such as glass-beaded moccasins, feather headdresses and leather clothing.

Grown out of the private collection of Tulsa oilman Thomas Gilcrease, the museum is now home to more than 10,000 paintings, prints and sculptures from prominent American artists such as Frederic Remington and Thomas Moran. …

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