Amid Crisis, Influential South Korean Politician Wants to Deploy US Nukes

By Marquand, Robert | The Christian Science Monitor, April 9, 2013 | Go to article overview

Amid Crisis, Influential South Korean Politician Wants to Deploy US Nukes


Marquand, Robert, The Christian Science Monitor


Calling international efforts to stop North Korea from building atomic weapons a "miserable failure," a prominent South Korean lawmaker today called for the deployment of tactical US nuclear weapons in the South and suggested that his country think about developing their own nuclear deterrent.

The call by M.J. Chung, a seven-term member of the Korean National Assembly and former presidential candidate, comes amid the biggest spike of tensions on the Korean peninsula in recent years. Among other threats, the new young leader of North Korea, Kim Jong- un, has threated to target Guam and Hawaii, and turn Seoul, South Korea's capital, into a "sea of fire."

While few analysts think the White House or Pentagon would consider deploying nuclear weapons in Korea when they are already available at US facilities elsewhere, it may be a sign of Korean frustrations. It also could give leaders in Beijing something to think about - as it appears that Chinese technology and aid enable the regime in Pyongyang to survive.

Mr. Chung said "the lesson of the cold war" is that nuclear weapons must counter nuclear weapons for a threat to be credible. If deployed in South Korea, weapons of mass destruction would be an important bargaining chip, said Chung, who asked South Koreans to start "thinking the unthinkable" in order to deter war.

"North Korea's economy is collapsed, it is isolated, and yet we have failed to stop them from gaining nuclear weapons," he said to a roomful of policymakers and officials in a keynote address at an annual Carnegie Endowment for International Peace meeting in Washington. He argued that future generations would call the current dealings with North Korea one of the "most spectacular and consequential failures" of the age.

Chung recommended that if South Korea decided to develop its own nuclear deterrence, it could "temporarily" suspend its membership in the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT), to which it has been a signatory since the 1970s.

The provocative nature of that call was amplified since it was made at a Washington conference attended mostly by advocates of nonproliferation and disarmament.

"We have all failed and it is now up to us to think of new options," Chung said later in a Monitor interview.

North Korea's role

Chung urged Beijing to exert more pressure on the Kim Jong-un regime in Pyongyang, posing the question: "Does it make sense for China to keep North Korea as a buffer state even if it goes nuclear? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Amid Crisis, Influential South Korean Politician Wants to Deploy US Nukes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.