Take 5: Allison Miller, Burlesque at Black Cat and More

By Fulton, Robert | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, May 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Take 5: Allison Miller, Burlesque at Black Cat and More


Fulton, Robert, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Friday: Allison Miller and Boom Tic Boom at Strathmore

When Allison Miller was growing up in Olney, someone -- she can't remember who -- gave her a copy of the Miles Davis album "Miles Smiles." That's what turned her on to small-group improvisational jazz.

Miller is now a renowned jazz drummer. Her band, Boom Tic Boom, just released a new album, "No Morphine, No Lilies," and she performs Friday at Strathmore.

"I think Maryland had a really heavy influence," said Miller of growing up locally. "I've always loved the music coming out of Maryland and D.C. and Virginia because it has this kind of laid- back swing feeling that has a little bit of a Southern feeling to me, but it still has a little edge."

In addition to work with her own band, Miller records and performs with a number of well-known artists, and she teaches.

One of her greatest influences was her drum teacher growing up in Montgomery County, Walter Salb. He's since passed away, and she dedicated her new composition "Spotswood Drive" to him.

"He had a huge influence on me," Miller said. "He became a really good friend."

The title "No Morphine, No Lilies" comes from something her partner muttered while she was seriously ill and in the hospital.

"For me, it kind of symbolizes not running from the pain, kind of accepting it and moving through it," Miller said. "That's what a lot of this music is about, dealing with that pain."

"I come to music with so many different influences and inspirations," Miller added. "When I write, I don't try to put a new composition into a specific genre. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Take 5: Allison Miller, Burlesque at Black Cat and More
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.