Your Views - Letters from Our Readers; Opinion

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Your Views - Letters from Our Readers; Opinion


Post-Dispatch doesn't cover protest at Monsanto

On Saturday, an estimated 2 million people in 40 countries took part in over 400 marches to protest Monsanto's farming and business practices.

So what are we to make of the fact that over 600 protesters stood in the pouring rain outside of Monsanto's corporate headquarters in Creve Coeur and the Post-Dispatch didn't cover the event? Instead, it posted these Sunday headlines: "Monsanto is No. 1" and "Monsanto grows globally: Biotech giant leads Post-Dispatch list of top performers."

Monsanto's genetically engineered food poses established health risks, which include organ damage, cancer, birth defects, infant mortality and sterility. GMO ingredients are in an estimated 80 percent of American grocery store products.

Monsanto is bankrupting farmers, causing soil infertility, loss of biodiversity, and bee hive collapse. They are causing dependency on a centralized food system.

An open letter signed by 828 scientists in 84 countries has called for an immediate 5-year suspension of GMO crops and "a comprehensive public inquiry of agriculture and food security." GMOs have been entirely or partially banned in 15 countries.

On March 28, the U.S. signed the "Monsanto Protection Act" into law, freeing Monsanto from potential litigation, which could find GMOs unsafe. With momentum building in Congress to repeal this protection, shouldn't legislators know their constituents' concerns?

I don't think it's too much to ask the Post-Dispatch to recognize its journalistic responsibility in reporting the news.

Susie Chasnoff * University City

Father's statement is flawed on Catholic Church's teaching about homosexuality

Beneath the surface of Father Gary Meier's statement that the Catholic Church's stance on homosexuality causes harm (May 25) lies a serious misunderstanding of the church's teaching. The church recognizes that some people may have inborn homosexual tendencies and does not condemn people with such tendencies. What the church does teach is that a sexual act between two people of the same gender is intrinsically disordered. "Disordered" means that the act is contrary to created nature. "Intrinsic" means that the disorder is inherent in the act itself and that such an act can never become ordered to nature.

The basis for this teaching is revealed in the first and second chapters of Genesis. Human sexuality was created for the dual purpose of intimacy and procreation. These two aspects of sexuality are interdependent and cannot be separated. When a sexual act is robbed of its procreative aspect, intimacy is also compromised. This understanding of human sexuality has been consistently taught by the Judeo-Christian tradition for more than 3,000 years and has been ratified by the universal lived experience of human cultures, even those of other religious traditions.

The Catholic Church's teaching about disordered sexual acts is imposed not only on the homosexual community but on heterosexual people as well. People of all walks of life, whether they be homosexual, heterosexual, single, married or divorced, are urged to choose to live chastely, that is to regard and use sexuality for its proper God-given purpose. The church issues this prompting in love, knowing that the key to human happiness lies, not in seeking one's own gratification, but rather in fulfilling the creator's will.

When Father Meier fails to inform the homosexual community correctly, he does not serve them well. Nor does the Post-Dispatch when it gives undue attention to someone whose statements are flawed.

Carolyn Vokoun * Chesterfield

Crop insurance helps farmers in high-risk areas

In response to the Post-Dispatch's opinion (May 21) on the "Farm welfare" crop insurance, it was as one-sided and thoughtless as possible. …

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