Info Leaks Bedevil Health Care Industry

By McKenzie, Kevin | The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN), May 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

Info Leaks Bedevil Health Care Industry


McKenzie, Kevin, The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)


By simply typing the words "encrypt me" into the subject line of an e-mail, employees at the Regional Medical Center at Memphis can ensure that only an authorized person using a password will be able to unlock the encrypted information on the receiving end.

But three times since October, a single worker at the Memphis hospital mistakenly sent e-mails with attachments containing personal information of 1,180 outpatient physical therapy patients, hospital officials announced earlier this month.

The sensitive information, including names, Social Security numbers and reasons for therapy, was not encrypted the messsages weren't supposed to be sent at all, said Angie Golding, a spokeswoman for The Med.

Despite efforts to secure and protect patient information in an era of escalating identity theft, health care providers ranging from hospitals and medical practces to insurers can see thousands of electronic records slip from their grasp through accidents, loss and theft.

The incidents are no longer rare. In Tennessee, the federal Department of Health & Human Services lists 20 breaches of unsecured health information affecting 500 or more individuals from 2009 through 2012. The reported incidents have included:

At St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, the loss of a laptop that affected the personal information of about 1,745 people in April 2010.

At Baptist Memorial Hospital-Huntingdon, a loss of personal information in November 2010 that affected 4,800 people.

At Sumner County Emergency Services, the theft of a desktop computer last year that placed the personal information of 774 people at risk.

And the biggest breach by far listed in the state struck a Chattanooga-based health insurer, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, in October 2009. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Info Leaks Bedevil Health Care Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.