The Gazette's Viewpoint: Government Drowning America with A Daily Deluge of Regulations, Directives

The Gazette (Colorado Springs, CO), May 30, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Gazette's Viewpoint: Government Drowning America with A Daily Deluge of Regulations, Directives


America's economic and political infrastructure is awash in a flood of federal regulations that is growing deeper and more expensive every day. Consider these data points from the Competitive Enterprise Institute's latest edition of its annual "Ten Thousand Commandments" report:

- In the two decades CEI has published Ten Thousand Commandments, 81,883 final rules have been issued. That's more than 3,500 per

or about nine day.

- The Anti-Democracy Index -- the ratio of regulations issued to laws passed by Congress and signed by the president -- stood at 29 to 1 in 2012. That's 127 new laws and 3,708 new rules -- or a new rule every two-and-a-half hours.

- Some 63 departments, agencies and commissions currently have new regulations awaiting approval.

- The 2012 Federal Register had 78,961 pages. That's fourth highest all time. The top two all-time are 81,405 pages in 2010 and 81,247 pages in 2011.

- The EPA added 223 rules in 2012 -- sixth among federal agencies behind Treasury, Commerce, Interior, Agriculture and Transportation. But its overall total of 1,953 rules account for 48 percent of all federal rules, and their compliance cost -- $353 billion -- far exceeds that of all other agencies.

- Total annual costs for Americans to comply with federal regulations reached $1.806 trillion in 2012. For the first time, this amounts to more than half of total annual federal spending. It is more than the GDPs of Canada and Mexico.

- Regulatory costs amount to $14,678 per family -- 23 percent of the average household income of $63,685 and more than receipts from corporate and personal income taxes combined. …

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