Linda Jean (Rideout) Severance

Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), June 7, 2013 | Go to article overview

Linda Jean (Rideout) Severance


ORRINGTON - Linda Jean (Rideout) Severance, 63, loving wife of 47 years to Floyd Severance Sr., went home to be with her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ June 7, 2013, at her home surrounded by her family after a short but courageous battle with lung cancer. She was born June 20, 1949, in Bangor.

She married her high school sweetheart, Floyd Severance, June 19, 1965. She was a loving and devoted wife, mother, grandmother, great- grandmother, sister, aunt, cousin and friend. Her family was very special to her. Linda devoted over 18 years of her life volunteering for Orrington Ambulance Squad. She was also on the auxiliary and spent many evenings teaching CPR courses. Linda ended her time with the ambulance as an emergency medical technician-intermediate. She thrived on helping others in any way that was possible. Linda spent many years working at Canteen Services Co., in the money room. She spent time working at the State Hospital, working as a dispatcher for Bucksport Police Department and with Wade & Cyr as a first aid nurse. Linda's dedication to helping others extended to caring for the terminally ill. Linda spent the last six years working for Republic Parking at the downtown parking garage where she collected tickets. She had the best boss to work for and the other employees loved her. She touched the lives of many with her easy going smile and simple wave goodnight. Linda was an avid crafter and many times would knit baby sets and make fleece blankets to give away to anyone that was expecting a child. She loved the word "vacation." Floyd and Linda went on many vacations together. They enjoyed taking the Blue Nose Ferry to Canada, and visiting numerous different states and sights; North Carolina, Washington D. …

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