Promoting Collective Good through Prayer and Action

By Dokodzo, Peter Kokou | The Christian Science Monitor, June 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Promoting Collective Good through Prayer and Action


Dokodzo, Peter Kokou, The Christian Science Monitor


Is it possible for developing nations to obtain peace and prosperity, and to create a solid basis for long-lasting democracy and steady growth? Since the 1990s, efforts to establish democracy in Africa have been characterized by political unrest, but ongoing efforts have brought progress, including increased freedom of expression and better conditions for women. But there is still a long way to go to overcome major challenges resulting from the lack of transparency of some governments in the management of their affairs. Also challenging is their indifference to the well-being of their people, which fuels poverty, injustice, and corruption.

Believing that the welfare of a nation is strongly linked to political and economic conditions, people rest their hopes on politicians, their system of government, and human laws and regulations, which are not always reliable or long lasting. As soon as a government does not meet expectations, it is criticized, challenged, and held accountable for all problems.

The Bible, on the other hand, shows that when individuals are motivated to seek the common good, God supports both their progress and society's progress. Nehemiah, for example, wanted to rebuild Jerusalem and to protect it from its enemies, who had previously destroyed the city and enslaved the children of Israel (see Nehemiah, chapters 1-6). Nehemiah had at heart the collective good, but frightening opponents threatened his efforts. They formed an alliance to attack Jerusalem and to prevent its reconstruction.

Nehemiah, determined to rebuild the city that was so important for him and for his people, resisted the enemies' attacks by relying on God. He and his people had to stand very firm against strong opposition. The spiritual tools that helped them triumph were prayer, trust in God, alertness, fearlessness, love, humility, discernment of good, and faith in the power of goodness. Thanks to Nehemiah's strong reliance on God, the wall was rebuilt, and peace came not only for the children of Israel, but also for all their enemies.

Today the enemies seem to be bad governance, lack of resources, hatred, war, and disease. But these enemies can all be overcome by understanding that God alone governs the universe, and that His almighty power gives strength and promotes progress. Mary Baker Eddy writes in her book "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures": "Resist evil - error of every sort - and it will flee from you" (p. 406). Evil has no foundation to give it power or life because God is the only power.

Early in my career, I was chief accountant in a regional department of my country's Ministry of Agriculture. Everything was going well until I took over after my immediate supervisor suddenly departed. It was my deepest desire to put in place new procedures that would prevent dishonesty. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Promoting Collective Good through Prayer and Action
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.