Student Transfer Ruling Is Reversed; Court Again Says Unaccredited Districts Should Pay for Students to Attend Better Schools

By Crouch, Elisa | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), June 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

Student Transfer Ruling Is Reversed; Court Again Says Unaccredited Districts Should Pay for Students to Attend Better Schools


Crouch, Elisa, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The Missouri Supreme Court has once again rejected legal arguments against a state statute that could allow thousands of students to leave failing school districts for better schools.

In a ruling handed down Tuesday, the high court said a lower court decision incorrectly determined that the statute would be impossible to enforce and violated aspects of the Missouri Constitution.

The unanimous decision sends just one part of the case back to St. Louis County Circuit Court to determine the amount St. Louis Public Schools will be billed for back tuition payments for two students in the Clayton School District.

Tuesday's ruling appears to deny school districts their primary legal arguments for turning away students from unaccredited districts, which enroll more than 7,000 students in the St. Louis area alone.

The case which is commonly known as Turner vs. Clayton, but later took on the name Breitenfeld vs. Clayton involves two children living in St. Louis who were attending Clayton schools while the city school system was unaccredited. But it has sweeping implications for districts across Missouri.

It centers on a statute that allows students in unaccredited school districts to transfer to superior schools at no expense to their families. The failing district must pay for the children's education and transportation.

Because St. Louis Public Schools received provisional accreditation last fall, the law currently applies to students living in Missouri's three unaccredited school systems: Normandy, Riverview Gardens and Kansas City.

School officials across the region spent much of Tuesday afternoon trying to digest the 37-page ruling. They expressed uncertainty as to whether its scope was limited to Gina Breitenfeld's two children, or included thousands of children in unaccredited school districts.

In recent years, hundreds of parents have sought such transfers but have been denied enrollment pending the outcome of this case. It's unclear whether Tuesday's decision changes anything for the immediate future.

Elkin Kistner, Breitenfeld's attorney, predicted parents will want to assert their rights. "If I were a parent I would say, 'You'd better put my kid in your school. Now.'"

Chris Tennill, spokesman for Clayton schools, said the ruling fails to resolve the transfer issue in a way that protects all students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Student Transfer Ruling Is Reversed; Court Again Says Unaccredited Districts Should Pay for Students to Attend Better Schools
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.