Pet Owners Turn to Psychics, Tarot for Behavior Issues

By Clausing, Jeri | The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN), June 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

Pet Owners Turn to Psychics, Tarot for Behavior Issues


Clausing, Jeri, The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)


ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. It's the age-old and seemingly answerless question: What in the world is my dog thinking? It's one that has spawned a growing market not only of scientific research but also of everything from decks of pet tarot cards to television and radio shows and books by pet psychics and animal trainers.

Whether any of them can ever provide real answers to what dogs are thinking or what drives their good or bad behavior is a matter of opinion or belief. But pet owners can spend a lot of time and money trying.

And even if they never find a real solution, people who love their dogs admit they can learn to better connect with their pets, or sometimes just have fun trying.

Andrea Gladstone and David Radis of Encino, Calif., wanted to know more about what was going on in their rescue dog's head, so they bought "The Original Dog Tarot: Divine The Canine Mind," a set of 30 cards and a guidebook developed by Heidi Schulman, a freelance writer and former TV news producer who now lives in Santa Fe, N.M.

The answer they divined from the three cards LoLa picked the Cat, the Pack and Justice was that she was insecure with her place in the new home and wrecked the books to establish her security and see whether they held grudges.

"For me, it is more the fun of it than the life lessons to be learned. But I respect the tarot," Radis said. "I have done one reading for each of my dogs, and they were both spot on. I spread the cards out and ask the dog to touch the cards with their nose or paw."

Not everyone consults the latest books for gimmicks or fun. Cathy, an entertainment paralegal in California who asked that her last name not be used, called on pet psychic Jocelyn Kessler, author of "The Secret Language of Dogs," to help her communicate with her 11-year-old lab Champ when he fell ill.

Kessler, she said, "communicated with him energetically so that she could not only learn what he needed through his veterinary care, but also to understand whether he wanted us to stop medical treatments."

Through Kessler, Cathy said, she was able to learn that Champ needed fewer injections, and she was able to surround him with his favorite plants in his final days. …

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