Flyers' Shero Part of Hall Class

By Rossi, Rob | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

Flyers' Shero Part of Hall Class


Rossi, Rob, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Fred Shero can walk together forever with Hockey Hall of Famers.

Shero, a legendary NHL coach who won the Stanley Cup twice with the Philadelphia Flyers, was selected to the Hockey Hall of Fame as a "Builder" on Tuesday.

"If you talked to the players that played for him, they all said how much he was ahead of his time -- and if you look 40 years into the future, it's pretty amazing how right they were," said Ray Shero, the Penguins' general manager, of his late father's impact.

Fred Shero was the first NHL coach to hire a full-time assistant, rely on a system and mandate that players work with weights and study film. He also was one of the original proponents of a "morning skate" practice session on days of games -- a tactic he picked up from studying the Soviet Union Red Army squads.

He also led the transformation of the Flyers from an expansion squad into an iconic franchise.

Born in 1967, the Flyers played in -- and won -- their first Stanley Cup Final in 1974. They retained the Cup the next year and lost in the Final in 1976.

Their stars were captain Bobby Clarke and goaltender Bernie Parent, and their calling card was roughhousing, which led to their "Broad Street Bullies" nickname. However, as Penguins television broadcaster Paul Steigerwald noted, Shero's Flyers squads were equally reputable for their balance and tactical superiority.

Steigerwald was one of many within the hockey world often baffled that Shero was not already in the Hall of Fame.

"I mean, he's Freddie Shero, come on!" Steigerwald said. "He had a huge impact on the way this game is coached today. And when you think about the lasting image of those Flyers teams and you realize his connection -- you have to be aghast he wasn't already in the Hall of Fame."

Famous for his thinking deeply and leaving a room quickly, Shero won 390 games in nine seasons as an NHL coach. He also coached the New York Rangers. His clubs played in the Stanley Cup Final four times, and none of his eight playoff squads lost in the first round.

Ray Shero described his father as "a players' coach," and that was evident by the manner in which he delivered messages. Sometimes Fred Shero left a note in a player's glove, often he wrote on a chalkboard. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Flyers' Shero Part of Hall Class
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.