It's Time for 'Journalists' to Discover Journalism

By MacKinnon, Douglas | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, July 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

It's Time for 'Journalists' to Discover Journalism


MacKinnon, Douglas, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Will the last honest, ethical, and completely professional journalist please turn out the lights? The pretense of an objective mainstream media is long over.

I was recently speaking with two editors from top-10 newspapers who by their own admission see the world from different ends of the political spectrum and yet both were bemoaning the state of their profession.

One -- a bit right-of-center -- complained how more and more reporters and editors are putting their ideology before their duties as journalists and skewing stories and "news" accounts to reflect or enhance that ideology.

The other -- a bit left-of-center -- mentioned how completely unfair it was that conservatives are purposely shut out of consideration for Pulitzer and Nobel prizes while admitting his paper refuses to report on that unassailable reality because of its own bias.

I have often said that human nature dictates that people love to embrace the truth right up until the moment it reflects poorly upon themselves or their cause. When journalists and editors deliberately ignore -- or even work to discredit -- the truth, then all of us pay a price no matter which party, cause, or issue we support.

It seems almost everything now in mainstream journalism and the media is viewed through an ideological prism. More often than not, a prism only admitting and spreading a liberal light.

What happened to journalists and editors simply doing their jobs and following only the facts to their natural conclusions? What happened to talking to both sides in a contentious or highly controversial issue and then doing some actual investigating to see which -- if any -- side was closer to the truth?

What happened to the hard-boiled city editors as played by Clark Gable in the movie "Teacher's Pet" who believed the only job of a journalist was to find out "who, what, when, where, and why," and leave all personal feelings and bias out of the reporting? …

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