Will Portland Create 'Patient Safety Zone' around Planned Parenthood to Push Back Anti-Abortion Protesters?

By Koenig, Seth | Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), July 30, 2013 | Go to article overview

Will Portland Create 'Patient Safety Zone' around Planned Parenthood to Push Back Anti-Abortion Protesters?


Koenig, Seth, Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME)


PORTLAND, Maine -- Planned Parenthood officials and supporters are advocating for what they hope will become a "patient safety zone" around the organization's downtown Portland office after months of regular anti-abortion protests nearby.

At Tuesday night's meeting of the City Council's Public Safety, Health and Human Services Committee, panel members discussed a potential 35-foot buffer zone that would push protests farther from the entryway of the Congress Street Planned Parenthood.

Dozens of attendees packed the meeting at City Hall wearing pink in support of Planned Parenthood, while another group filed in wearing yellow T-shirts that read "GRR! Grandmothers for Reproductive Rights."

Others carried pink signs reading "Protect Me -- move forward with a Patient Safety Zone."

The committee is comprised of four city councilors -- panel chairman Ed Suslovic, vice chairman Cheryl Leeman, John Coyne and Jill Duson. Tuesday's panel discussion was held in a workshop setting, which included no public comment despite the heavy turnout and featured no official votes on the issue.

Portland neighborhood prosecutor Trish McAllister, a lawyer who works closely with the police department, told the committee that of 161 Planned Parenthood clients who responded to an organization questionnaire, 150 said they were made "uncomfortable" by the anti- abortion protests outside the facility.

McAllister said she personally fielded multiple complaints from organization leaders, as well as questions from police on duty who were unsure what to do in response to those complaints.

"Officers started coming to me and asking me about that fine line between peoples' right to protest and the rights of people trying to enter the facility," McAllister told the committee.

She also said that the department chief, Michael Sauschuck, distributed a letter to protesters in January warning of the type of activity that would cross the line between constitutionally protected free speech and illegal actions, such as "disorderly conduct, harassment, obstruction of a public way, as well as a fairly obscure state provision prohibiting any noise from a protest from being [loud enough to be] heard inside a facility where medical services are being offered."

"We have had a lot of complaints about intimidation and harassment," Sauschuck told the committee Tuesday. "We had no complaints that rose to a criminal level."

The chief said on many occasions, the protesters were confrontational with clinic patients or those passing by, and police faced difficult decisions on whether or not to press charges.

Sauschuck said one demonstrator scolded a patient by saying, "We will wrap your legs in barbed wire, and you will burn in hellfire. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Will Portland Create 'Patient Safety Zone' around Planned Parenthood to Push Back Anti-Abortion Protesters?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.