Dusting off the Oldies; the Blender - Brothers Lazaro's 'Hope, Fear, Youth' Compiles the Best of the Band's Hard-to-Find Early Work

By Johnson, Kevin | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 27, 2013 | Go to article overview

Dusting off the Oldies; the Blender - Brothers Lazaro's 'Hope, Fear, Youth' Compiles the Best of the Band's Hard-to-Find Early Work


Johnson, Kevin, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


A Brothers Lazaroff concert is bound to include songs fans can't find on any Brothers Lazaroff album.

The eclectic, American-rooted band, fronted by brothers David and Jeff Lazaroff, is prone to augment its sets with songs from the early days from before the current lineup with Grover Stewart on drums, Teddy Brookins on bass and Mo Egeston on keyboards.

These songs date back a decade, in some cases even further, and mostly were recorded in Austin, Texas.

"Some of the songs were from albums from college, and we recorded them on machines that weren't state-of-the-art technology," David Lazaroff says. "We didn't feel they represent what we do quality- wise, as we've developed ourselves and changing our style and vibe building off the influences of Teddy and Grover and Mo."

Some came from early releases (and nonreleases), such as "Pure Delight" (2005), Jeff Lazaroff's "Row of Trees" (2004) and his self- titled album (2001), and David Lazaroff's "Melancholy Cracks" (2003).

"People would ask us what CD has this song and what CD had that song, and we didn't have a recorded version anymore," Lazaroff says.

Now, fans can add those missing songs to their collections with "Hope, Fear, Youth." The full band entered the studio eight months ago and re-recorded new versions of those songs in one night and in one take.

"The songs take on a whole new life with this group," he says. "It's very interesting and fun stuff and sounds really sick. It's not an overthought studio album. We went in there and tried to get a live feel."

Also, says Lazaroff, "most people don't know this backstory and will enjoy the CD as if it was new. …

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