Sibling's Behavior Might Require Lawyer Intervention

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 5, 2013 | Go to article overview

Sibling's Behavior Might Require Lawyer Intervention


Associated Press

Today is Saturday, Oct. 5, the 278th day of 2013. There are 87 days left in the year.

Highlights in history

In 1892: The Dalton Gang, notorious for its train robberies, was practically wiped out while attempting to rob a pair of banks in Coffeyville, Kan.

In 1921: The World Series was carried on radio for the first time as Newark, N.J. station WJZ (later, WABC) relayed a telephone play- by-play account of the first game from the Polo Grounds, where the New York Giants were facing the New York Yankees, to a studio announcer who repeated the information on the air. (The Yankees won the opener, 3-0, the Giants won the series, 5 games to 3.)

In 1931: Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon completed the first non- stop flight across the Pacific Ocean, arriving in Washington state some 41 hours after leaving Japan.

In 1947: President Harry S. Truman delivered the first televised White House address as he spoke on the world food crisis.

In 1981: President Ronald Reagan signed a resolution granting honorary American citizenship to Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, credited with saving thousands of Hungarians, most of them Jews, from the Nazis during World War II.

In 1990: A jury in Cincinnati acquitted an art gallery and its director of obscenity charges stemming from an exhibit of sexually graphic photographs by the late Robert Mapplethorpe.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama accused presidential candidate John McCain's campaign of trying to distract voters with "smears" rather than talking about substance.

One year ago: A month before the presidential election, unemployment fell to its lowest level, 7.8 percent, since President Barack Obama took office; some Republicans questioned whether the numbers had been manipulated.,by JERALDINE SAUNDERS

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Today's new moon could mark the beginning of a few weeks when you are more aware of how much you rely upon others.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Make a choice between seeing yourself as being tied to the past or using it as an anchor.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Busy schedules require careful organization. Happy-go-lucky ways won't cut the mustard under celestial conditions.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You must pass a few tests before you'll be certified to succeed. A key relationship could test your resolve or loyalty.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Rather than starting something new, take care of what you have. Keep nice things in tiptop condition. Schedule routine oil changes or dental appointments.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The scatter-brained need not apply. Loved ones may expect you to be organized and precise about small details.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Win a few, lose a few. As the lunar cycle recharges with a new moon in your sign, you may question the value of a relationship.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Look for a safe haven. This new moon could mark a time when you retreat from the bustle and crave peace and quiet.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Friendships act as a fulcrum to fulfill a need. The new moon brings your goals, objectives and connections in the outer world into focus.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It's all in how to view it. The past may become a building block for a new foundation or a ball and chain.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Memories can make your day. You may stumble upon an old love letter or memorable photo. You might get on the phone or the Internet to contact old friends.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Accept responsibilities and honor commitments. Take pride in your ability to help the underdog.

IF OCT. 5 IS YOUR BIRTHDAY: Those born on this day may have paid their dues and learned their lessons well, but now need to patiently wait for the best time to launch key plans. …

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