Examiner Editorial: Former ACORNers Have Lots of Government Friends

Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, October 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

Examiner Editorial: Former ACORNers Have Lots of Government Friends


Remember the Association of Communities Organized for Reform Now? That was the corrupt, far-left activist group better known as ACORN that over the years received hundreds of millions of dollars in federal grants and contracts despite repeated government and media reports of funding irregularities. The group constantly agitated for mortgage lending policies that were a major factor in causing the housing bubble and the economic disasters that followed. ACORN officially disbanded in 2010 after Congress passed a law barring federal departments and agencies from giving tax dollars to the group and created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to prevent a recurrence of the Great Recession of 2008. Today, ACORN is a just a bad memory, and CFPB chairman Richard Cordray is supposedly hard at work protecting Americans.

Not quite. While it's true that the national organization known as ACORN formally disbanded, most of its officials and members simply reorganized using different group names and continued agitating for the same policies that to this day push mortgage lenders to give loans to people with lousy credit. For example, Bruce Dorpalen was formerly ACORN's director of housing and is now executive director of the National Housing Resource Center, an ACORN spin-off.

Documents obtained from CFPB under the Freedom of Information Act by government watchdog group Judicial Watch reveal that Dorpalen has many friends at the bureau:

- In a Dec. 10, 2012, email, CFPB Senior Advisor Brenda Muniz told Dorpalen he would "be the one to introduce Director Cordray" at an NHRC Leaders in Housing Counseling forum to be held at Washington's Renaissance Hotel two days later. …

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