Maine Lagging Behind Other New England States in Education, Reforms Needed, New Coalition Study Says

By Koenig, Seth | Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), October 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

Maine Lagging Behind Other New England States in Education, Reforms Needed, New Coalition Study Says


Koenig, Seth, Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME)


PORTLAND, Maine -- A coalition of business leaders and educators released a report Thursday morning showing Maine lags behind other New England states in terms of preschool enrollment, college graduation and reading and math proficiencies, among other things.

Educate Maine, an organization led by business executives and school administrators across a range of grade levels, issued its inaugural Education Indicators for Maine report Thursday at a news conference at Casco Bay High School in Portland.

The study found that Maine ranks behind the New England average in several of the group's key indicators spanning multiple student ages, from prekindergarten to adulthood. The report set a goal of ensuring that 50 percent of all Mainers have a college degree, certificate or industry credential by 2023 -- a benchmark which, if reached, would put the state at what the New England average is expected to be at that time.

Currently, between 37 percent and 39 percent of Mainers have one of those credentials.

In order to hit that 2023 goal, Educate Maine representatives said Thursday that the state must invest more in all levels of education, and schools across Maine must pursue proficiency-based graduation models.

"It is no longer OK that we move kids through grade levels because of their ages or seat time," said Allyn Hutton, superintendent of schools in Kittery and an Educate Maine board member. Hutton said in Kittery, high school freshman science programs are piloting a proficiency-based model now, with plans to expand it to the entire ninth-grade curriculum next year.

In a proficiency-based model, students advance to the next grade level by showing they understand the concepts they're supposed to have learned to move up, rather than by obtaining a minimum letter grade or age.

Although 85 percent of Maine students graduate high school, the Educate Maine study suggests, only 48 percent of high school juniors in the state are proficient in reading and math.

"What does that diploma mean if they've graduated high school, but don't have proficiency in core subjects?" posed Ronald Cantor, president of Southern Maine Community College, during the Thursday morning news conference. "It means [students] can go to college, but they can't do college work."

As a result, he said, post-secondary institutions in the state must spend more on remedial classes to help them catch up, or the students flunk out and are burdened by heavy loan debts with no degree to show for it.

"Maine has more than 200,000 adults with some college, but no college degree," said Susan Hunter, vice chancellor of academic affairs for the University of Maine system. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Maine Lagging Behind Other New England States in Education, Reforms Needed, New Coalition Study Says
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.