Great Gardening: Embracing Nature's Wonders amid November Gloom

By Cunningham, Sally | The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY), November 15, 2013 | Go to article overview

Great Gardening: Embracing Nature's Wonders amid November Gloom


Cunningham, Sally, The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY)


As the sky turned dark at 4 p.m., I walked past the half-tree the winds took down the other night and contemplated all that is November. I was looking for the beauty - there, a sedum held its dignified head aloft - but in truth my pants and the dog were equally muddy and soggy, my nose was dripping and my hands were cold. I thought: This is the worst time of year.

Preferring to offer my readers - an upbeat lot of gardeners in general - a more positive note, I turned to some poets' and writers' views on autumn, and found many ways to consider it.

Many poets focused on the riot of color, the glories of the harvest - all the pretty parts. William Cullen Bryant (1794-1878) named it, "Autumn, the year's last, loveliest smile."

...

Samuel Coleridge, in a similar time period wrote:Why is it that so many of us persist in thinking

that autumn is a sad season?

Nature has merely fallen asleep, and her

dreams must be beautiful

if we are to judge by her countenance.

...

Many wrote of the more subtle beauty of the season:It is a joy to walk in the bare woods.

The moonlight is not broken by the heavy leaves.The leaves are down, and touching the soaked earth,

Giving off the odors that partridges love.- Robert Bly (1926-), from "Solitude Late at

Night in the Woods"

...

Nearly all refer to autumn as a period of transition, and connect the theme of our own life cycles, aging and death:I like spring, but it is too young. I like summer,

but it is too proud. So I like best of all autumn,

because its tone is mellower, its colours are richer,

and it is tinged with a little sorrow. Its golden

richness speaks not of ... but of the mellowness

and kindly wisdom of approaching age. It knows

the limitations of life and its content.- Lin Yutang (1895- 1976)Autumn is the eternal corrective.

It is ripeness and color and a time of maturity;

but it is also breadth, and depth, and distance.

What man can stand with autumn on a hilltop

and fail to see the span of his world

and the meaning of the rolling hills that reach to

the far horizon?- Hal Borland (1900-1978)

...

Some garden writers simply tell what they see:All the cabbages in our garden are robust and

green to the core;All the peppers are dead and black, not red anymore. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Great Gardening: Embracing Nature's Wonders amid November Gloom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.