Carolina Fights Back after Clergy Attack

By Mary E O'Leary | New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), October 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Carolina Fights Back after Clergy Attack


Mary E O'Leary, New Haven Register (New Haven, CT)


new haven » Kermit Carolina, in response to criticism of his involvement in politics by a clergy group, said he is considering contacting the Internal Revenue Service about the tax-exempt status of the organization because of its own actions in supporting a candidate.

The Greater New Haven Clergy Association sent a letter to Carolina, principal of James Hillhouse High School, demanding his "complete and unfettered attention to educating our young citizens" at Hillhouse. The letter said the group couldn't understand "how your continued high profile participation in local political activities, including in-your-face attacks of the front running candidate for mayor and the current governor, benefits the students and staff of Hillhouse High."It asked that Carolina "either focus your energy on transforming Hillhouse into a premier school in the region, or resign your position as school leader."

The clergy group in July announced its support for state Sen. Toni Harp, who has since won the four-way Democratic primary for mayor.Several attorneys have said that the rules are clear on churches and religious organizations not participating directly and indirectly in campaigns on behalf of or in opposition to public office candidates, if they want to maintain their tax-exempt status. Carolina, up until the Sept. 10 primary, was one of Harp's opponents, and the letter references his confrontation with Gov. Dannel P. Malloy when Malloy came to New Haven on primary day and Carolina criticized him for weighing in on a New Haven issue.Malloy said he and Harp, as co-chairwoman of the Appropriations Committee, work closely together in Hartford, and he believed she was the best candidate in the sharply contested mayoral primary. The governor benefitted from union support in his 2010 election, the same coalition of labor now backing Harp and a group he will need in a run for a second term.After the primary, Carolina announced his support for Alderman Justin Elicker, who came in second behind Harp, and who now is running for mayor as an independent. He has been out campaigning with Elicker on weekends and in the evening.Carolina said the criticism by the clergy group, whose members are mainly black ministers, is a "thinly veiled political attack against me, which comes about as a result of its questionable alliance with the Toni Harp campaign." The campaign has had no comment on the letter from the clergy group or Carolina's response.Carolina, in his statement, said if the president of the clergy organization, the Rev. James W. Newman III, had real concerns about his political activities, he could have come and discussed them with him. Carolina said other church leaders, who do not belong to the association, "have been strong supporters of Hillhouse High School in a plethora of ways."Newman said he did not want to get involved in a back-and- forth on the letter, when asked for comment Saturday.Carolina also pointed to the "clearly partisan behavior of its former President Boise Kimber," as well as former Superintendent of Schools Reginald Mayo's open political support for Mayor John DeStefano Jr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Carolina Fights Back after Clergy Attack
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.