A NEW YOU: Put on a Happy Smile on Your Face

New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), September 29, 2013 | Go to article overview

A NEW YOU: Put on a Happy Smile on Your Face


During the California Gold Rush, a story was told about three gold-seeking friends who went on an expedition and discovered a rich vein of gold. When they realized what a great finding they had made, the three promised each other to keep their breakthrough a secret while they journeyed back to town to file their claim and obtain the equipment needed to mine the precious metal.

Back in town, the friends were discreet. Without any fanfare, they quickly filed their claims and inconspicuously acquired the necessary equipment to recover the gold. They didn't say a word to anyone about their findings.

But when they started to make their way back to the mine, a flock of onlookers followed them. The friends looked at one other and shrugged their shoulders as if they were reading each other's minds. Perplexed, they couldn't understand why they attracted a crowd.

Then, scratching his forehead, one friend turned to a gentleman in the large group and asked, "Sir, why are you following us?" The gentleman raised his eyebrows and replied, "We sensed you had found a treasure because of the expression of delight aglow on your faces."

Being joyful and enthusiastic affects those around us. For when there is joy within, it shows.

Are you enthusiastic and excited about the day ahead? Is there a smile on your face? Or, has your radiant smile turned upside-down because you're struggling with feelings of worthlessness, a setback or obstacles in your path.

Perhaps, your joy and enthusiasm have come to a screeching halt as you dwell on, 'What you don't have' 'what you wish were different,' 'who is better than you,' or 'what you can't do.' Then, if you're not careful, you may withdraw and stop really living for you might be looking to the past and seeing mistakes and failures, opposition and offenses. And when you think about the future, you imagine more of the same.

But today is a new day. It's a gift to you from God. So don't go through your days distracted, sad, discouraged and regretful. Your time is much too valuable to just settle for monotony. You are an extraordinary person with many gifts and abilities that can be used to make a difference in the lives of others. And maybe you've been challenged, not for where you've been, but because of where you are going.

A while ago, I read a book about wildlife artist, John James Audubon (1785-1851). One of the greatest naturalists that America has ever produced, it told how Audubon would vanish into the wilderness for months; and when he would return, he would have numerous, precious drawings of birds. Then, once, after months of being away, Audubon opened his truck where he had stored his cherished drawings and found that the rats had gnawed at them, destroying his works of art.

However, rather than being discouraged and falling back in despair, Audubon professed to a friend, "They have destroyed my drawings but not my enthusiasm. …

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