Cancer Deaths Holding Steady in Wyo

By news | Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), January 9, 2014 | Go to article overview

Cancer Deaths Holding Steady in Wyo


news, Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY)


Cancer deaths holding pretty steady in Wyoming Written Jan. 8, 2014 By the numbers The following is a list of cancer cases and deaths reported in Wyoming from 2000-11. 2011 New cancer cases 1,336 men 1,151 women 2,487 total cases Cancer deaths 520 men 409 women 929 total 2010 New cancer cases 1,447 men 1,258 women 2,705 total Cancer deaths 511 men 47 women 981 total 2009 New cancer cases 1,369 men 1,149 women 2,518 total Cancer deaths 454 men 441 women 895 total 2008 New cancer cases 1,387 men 1,094 women 2,481 total Cancer deaths 467 men 408 women 875 total 2007 New cancer cases 1,316 men 1,013 women 2,329 total Cancer deaths 503 men 419 women 922 total 2006 New cancer cases 1,316 men 1,013 women 2,329 total Cancer deaths 503 men 419 women 922 total 2005 New cancer cases 1,144 men 999 women 2,143 total Cancer deaths 454 men 441 women 895 total 2004 New cancer cases 1,184 men 1,014 women 2,198 total Cancer deaths 458 men 426 women 884 total 2003 New cancer cases 1,186 men 1,055 women 2,241 total Cancer deaths 502 men 433 women 935 total 2002 Cancer cases 1,123 men 997 women 2,120 total Cancer deaths 440 men 419 women 859 deaths 2001 New cancer cases 1,196 men 944 women 2,140 total Cancer deaths 494 men 429 women 923 total 2000 New cancer cases 1,080 men 953 women 2,033 total Cancer deaths 447 men 424 women 871 total Source: Wyoming Department of Health By Becky Orr CHEYENNE - This year, 2,890 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in Wyoming, based on projections from the American Cancer Society. The new ACS report also projects that 990 people in Wyoming will die from cancer this year. Wyoming's numbers are part of the estimated 1,665,540 new cases of cancer that will be diagnosed across the nation in 2014. About 585,720 Americans will die from it this year. While the numbers are sobering, there is good news too. The ACS reports a steady drop in cancer death rates during the last 20 years. Deaths from cancer nationwide dropped 20 percent overall in the last two decades, Shane Ferraro of the ACS said Tuesday. America has made great progress in cancer research and early detection, Ferraro said. People have learned about the dangers of smoking, for example, he said. In the 1960s, about half of the adults in the United States smoked, but that has dropped to about 18 percent now, he said. Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, said Joe Grandpre, chronic disease epidemiologist for the Wyoming Department of Health. The 20 percent decline means that 1.3 million lives have been saved, Ferraro said. Among men, about half of the new national cases likely will be for prostate, lung and colon cancers. The three most common cancers nationwide for women this year will be breast, lung and colon cancers. …

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