Tenn. Students' Achievement Evident

By Phillips, Vicki | The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN), January 16, 2014 | Go to article overview

Tenn. Students' Achievement Evident


Phillips, Vicki, The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)


All Tennesseans should be proud that the state is leading the nation in student achievement gains, but teachers should be especially proud because they made it happen.

I was spending the day with teachers in Memphis when the results of the 2012 National Assessment of Educational Progress came out in November. I can hardly explain the excitement I felt just being there. The NAEP also known as the "Nation's Report Card" showed that Tennessee students improved in both of the areas and grades tested English/Language Arts and Math in fourth and eighth grades. Tennessee's progress places it first among the states in improvement from 2011 to 2012.

And while that is impressive, teachers know the progress students have made isn't measured only by NAEP scores. Students also have improved literacy and math skills through their work in the classroom and on the state assessments over the last few years. The evidence of increased student achievement is starting to accumulate.

Frankly, I'm not surprised.

Since our partnership with the Memphis City Schools began four years ago, the College Ready Education Team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has closely watched and learned. Memphis City Schools is now Shelby County Schools, but one thing that hasn't changed is an unwavering focus on teaching and learning.

Indeed, your district leaders and teachers have designed and implemented a ground-breaking approach to fostering high-quality instruction. Shelby County's Teacher and Leader Effectiveness focus combines what I like to call "high supports and high demands." It elevates strong, respected teachers into leadership positions so they can mentor and guide colleagues while also continuing their classroom teaching. Teacher evaluation is focused on feedback and based on a number of factors including peer observations using a teacher-designed tool, student growth and achievement, stakeholder perception and professional learning. Finally, teachers receive rewards, career opportunities and recognition for their accomplishments. Shelby County puts it simply as: "Supports. Feedback. Rewards."

Shelby County is becoming a model for how to put teachers front and center in education. It is a commitment I feel personally, one that is rooted in my own teaching experience. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tenn. Students' Achievement Evident
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.