Local Asian Americans Divided on Allowing Affirmative Action in Higher Education

By Gazzar, Brenda | Pasadena Star-News, March 14, 2014 | Go to article overview

Local Asian Americans Divided on Allowing Affirmative Action in Higher Education


Gazzar, Brenda, Pasadena Star-News


A proposal to restore affirmative action in the state higher education system has divided the Asian-American community across California, largely along ethnic lines that mirror the groups' primary socioeconomic status.

Some groups representing larger and more established Asian populations such as Chinese-Americans oppose the proposal asking voters to consider doing away with Proposition 209's ban on the use of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin in recruitment, admissions and retention programs at California's public universities and colleges.

The proposed Senate Constitutional Amendment 5 by state Sen. Ed Hernandez, D-West Covina, would allow schools the option to again consider those factors in decisions, but would not make it mandatory.

Groups representing more recent and disadvantaged immigrant populations, such as Cambodians, support SCA 5.

The Joint Chinese University Alumni Association sponsored a high- profile rally expressing their "strong opposition" to the proposal last week in the San Gabriel Valley, arguing it would punish their children for working hard to achieve the American Dream. But other Asian-Americans, such as Cambodian-American Seng So, argue that Asian groups who face considerable disadvantages stand much to lose by not supporting the proposal.

"We want to ensure that communities that have dealt with struggle or issues that have set them back are able to find opportunities and find success, whether it be through the educational arena or in society in general," said So, who works with Cambodian and other Southeast Asian boys and young men at the Long Beach-based Khmer Girls in Action. They should also "have support systems that allow them to gain access to institutions that have historically been denied to them."

While the measure affects all ethnic groups around the state, so far Asian organizations have been the most vocal about its impacts.

Only 13 percent of Cambodian-Americans and 12 percent of Laotians in Los Angeles County have a bachelor's degree or higher, compared with 47 percent of Chinese and 44 percent of Caucasians, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates from 2006-2010.

But in the affluent San Gabriel Valley suburb of San Marino, Chinese-American Vivian Chan said the idea of affirmative action goes against the nation's democratic values.

"This particular bill is saying the university can choose one student over another because of their (skin) color," she said. "On the basis of American rights, it's wrong."

Chan worries that her youngest child's chances of being accepted into the college of her choice - she's now a junior at San Marino High School - could be hurt if she had to contend with affirmative action applicants.

"You're taking all these American students who work hard all their life and you're not going to have an opportunity even if you qualify because of your skin color? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Local Asian Americans Divided on Allowing Affirmative Action in Higher Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.