Vladimir Putin's Illusory Triumph in Ukraine

By Chapman, Steve | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, March 20, 2014 | Go to article overview

Vladimir Putin's Illusory Triumph in Ukraine


Chapman, Steve, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Bungling is an inherent feature of American foreign policy. Even with the best of intentions, our presidents miss warning signs, overreact to minor threats, fail to dissuade other governments from doing things we oppose and wade into situations that blow up in our faces.

It's not a Republican or Democratic thing. In trying to shape events in a big, turbulent world of competing nations, failure is just more common than success. In his novel American Pastoral, Philip Roth writes, "That's how we know we're alive: We're wrong." That's also how you know you're president.

George H.W. Bush inadvertently gave Saddam Hussein a green light to invade Kuwait in 1990. Bill Clinton's careless extension of our intervention in Somalia led to the Mogadishu debacle. George W. Bush made a horrific mess of the Iraq occupation. Barack Obama threatened Syria with air strikes only to back down.

When our presidents take action, we are fully aware they may not know what they're doing. But when foreign leaders take action, we assume they are brilliant strategists who never set a foot wrong.

So Vladimir Putin's invasion of Crimea is taken to reflect his cunning sense of American weakness and his shrewd eye for geopolitical advantage. House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, R-Mich., claimed, "Putin is playing chess, and I think we are playing marbles."

But if Putin were a foreign policy grandmaster, he wouldn't have pushed Ukrainians so far that they toppled the government he was propping up. He would have devised a way to secure Russian interests in Crimea without using force and exposing himself as a goon.

This alleged stroke of genius was guaranteed to alienate his neighbors and most of the world -- and even discomfit the Chinese government, which he covets as an ally. Putin is making the best of a bad situation that he did much to create.

Sunday's referendum went as the Russian president hoped. But he may have taken a bite too big to swallow. Crimea is no gold mine. Poor, undeveloped and rife with organized crime, it was a drain on Ukraine and will be a drain on Russia.

In trying to control Ukraine, he turned it into a bitter enemy. …

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