Film Industry Lobbies for Continued Tax Credits

The Gazette (Colorado Springs, CO), March 29, 2014 | Go to article overview

Film Industry Lobbies for Continued Tax Credits


MIAMI (AP) -- The Clearwater Marine Aquarium was heavily featured in the 2011 film "Dolphin Tale," which told a fictionalized account of Winter the dolphin. In real life, Winter lost her tail after it became caught in a crab trap in 2005. She was found and taken to Clearwater Marine Aquarium, where she was fitted with a silicone and plastic tail that enabled her to swim normally. The film, starring Harry Connick Jr., Ashley Judd and Morgan Freeman, reached audiences worldwide.

The movie transformed the aquarium, said David Yates, the facility's CEO. Approximately 200,000 people visited the aquarium the year before the movie was released, but that number jumped to 750,000 the next year. More than 300,000 out-of-state aquarium visitors said they came because of the movie. A recent movie industry study said that almost 20 percent of visitors said viewing a movie or television series filmed in Florida contributed to their decision to travel here.

"Driving tourism and promoting the state through movies is incredibly valuable," Yates said. "There's no other mode of advertising or marketing that can touch the value on a dollar for dollar basis."

The aquarium's story is one that Film Florida, a lobbying group for the state's entertainment industry, pushed recently when a delegation of filmmakers and others met with lawmakers in Tallahassee about extending the state's incentive program for luring movie and TV production. The current program, which was supposed to run from 2010 to 2016, has already used up the $296 million in tax credits it was allocated and has been suspended.

"The program effectively is out of money," Film Florida President Leah Sokolowsky said. "So there's no ability to attract new production."

Similar bills for a new program have already been filed in the House and Senate (HB 983 and SB 1640). The main difference is that the House bill would provide $200 million a year in tax credits through 2020, while the Senate bill would provide $50 million a year.

Advocates say the film incentive program not only brings in tourists but provides good-paying jobs for local actors, camera operators, sound techs, electricians, hair stylists, make-up artists and other trades that comprise a TV or movie crew. Money is also spent with local businesses. A study released last month by the Motion Picture Association of America concluded that Florida's current film incentive program supported 87,870 jobs, $2. …

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