EDITORIAL: Connecticut Must Help Older, Unemployed Workers

New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), April 13, 2014 | Go to article overview

EDITORIAL: Connecticut Must Help Older, Unemployed Workers


Connecticut's General Assembly is considering a bill that targets discrimination against the unemployed. It deserves passage, but is only a small start toward tackling a big problem: the plight of older workers who have gone months and even years without finding a job.

Nationally, the ranks of "long-term unemployed" people -- jobless for more than six months -- stands at 3.7 million, up from 1.1 million in 2006.

The legislation being considered in Connecticut would take modest steps toward addressing the problem: simply banning employers from saying in a job ad that the unemployed are not eligible for consideration.

It's mind-boggling that a company would put that in a job ad in the first place but, apparently, it happens. And 12 other states are considering similar legislation, according to The Associated Press.

The Connecticut Business and Industry Association supports banning such language in job ads, but opposes a provision in the bill that would allow applicants to sue if they suspect discrimination based on their joblessness. We agree that the bar for proving this kind of discrimination should be high and that the wording of the bill should be tweaked accordingly.

But in addressing the issue of long-term unemployment, we need to address the elephant in the room. Many in this situation are over the age of 50, but far too young to retire -- mentally, physically and financially.

They can't find work because employers have preconceived ideas about their ideal candidate -- someone who can be "molded" versus what they perceive as an older worker set in their ways, someone who is a "digital native," someone who is on the upward swing of a career trajectory instead of "on the way down. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

EDITORIAL: Connecticut Must Help Older, Unemployed Workers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.