Financial Planning Makes College Education a Reality for Many in the New Year

By Brandpoint | St. Joseph News-Press, January 13, 2014 | Go to article overview

Financial Planning Makes College Education a Reality for Many in the New Year


Brandpoint, St. Joseph News-Press


(BPT) - The new year is widely associated with personal resolutions for self-improvement that range from physical fitness to cutting out vices. For many, the goal of returning to school to earn a college degree provides the opportunity for impactful, long- lasting change and a more fulfilling life and career.

New data shows college graduates receive benefits in addition to a higher salary potential and lower chance of unemployment. For example, in 2011, 14 percent more bachelor's degree holders were covered by employer-provided health insurance when compared to individuals holding a high school diploma. That same year, 65 percent of bachelor's degree holders working full time, year-round were offered retirement plans by their employers, compared to only 52 percent of high school graduates.

Career growth, job stability and employee benefits have increased the pursuit of a college education, and with it, the cost of earning a degree. This new year, many students and their families are exploring diverse financial planning options to help make college education affordable, and the aforementioned benefits a reality.

Financial aid experts like Michelle Stipp, director of student finance operations for DeVry University, suggest students explore all opportunities to decrease supplemental student loans that may be needed to cover remaining tuition costs.

"Financial aid that the student does not have to pay back should be the first priority," says Stipp. "This category consists of scholarships and grants offered by institutions and third parties, such as the federal government, state government or private or nonprofit organizations. These opportunities should be maximized to keep student loan levels as low as possible." The U.S. Department of Education provides an online financial aid resource at studentaid.ed.gov to help students plan accordingly. Stipp suggests also exploring the following options:

* Online scholarship search tools

The sheer volume of options can make finding the right scholarship a challenge for prospective students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Financial Planning Makes College Education a Reality for Many in the New Year
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.