PRICE AMONG FINALISTS FOR HIGH COURT Superior Court Judge's Name on Governor's List

By Hill, Kip | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), April 26, 2014 | Go to article overview

PRICE AMONG FINALISTS FOR HIGH COURT Superior Court Judge's Name on Governor's List


Hill, Kip, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


On Friday afternoon in the courtroom once presided over by his uncle, Ralph Foley, Spokane County Superior Court Judge Michael Price was deciding whether to reinstate a man's driver's license after he refused a breath analysis.

Thanking the attorneys for their arguments, Price denied the appeal.

Both congratulated the 10-year veteran of the court on the announcement he was among the finalists to replace outgoing Washington state Supreme Court Justice James M. Johnson.

"It's just a list," Price said, grinning.

Gov. Jay Inslee's office said Friday it expects to make a decision soon about who will be appointed to replace Johnson, who announced his early retirement last month due to health concerns. Price, a longtime family lawyer and two-term chief criminal judge in Spokane County, sent his application to Olympia shortly thereafter.

If selected, Price would be one of two justices on the court from Eastern Washington, joining Justice Debra Stephens. More importantly, Price said, he would be a second trial judge voice on the nine-member panel, joining former King County Superior Court Judge and sitting Justice Steven GonzA!lez.

"It's important that those justices that are making those decisions that mean so much to us in the state have walked in the shoes of a trial judge," Price said, citing decisions that have overturned convictions based on procedural errors that didn't actually affect the outcome of cases.

The decisions of the high court, Price said, set the table for all courtroom proceedings throughout the state. …

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